The Lamb

March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb, the saying goes.  This one started off no differently than in most years–a month in transition, weeks that feel as if the earth is holding its breath until spring decides if it will remain or go back into hiding. The weather is another matter, almost schizophrenic in its indecision. The first couple of weeks of March this year the Pacific Northwest got more than 18 inches of rain. We normally average seven.

In one window of time, a window that is still wide open, tragedy has struck all around. A vast mudslide buried a whole community, swallowing up houses, cars, people, everything in its path. A helicopter fell from a helipad onto traffic below. A father died, skiing an easy run on a blue bird day.

Yesterday, I got in the elevator at the medical center behind a woman in a wheelchair, her leg bandaged from a recent amputation, her head shaved, likely because of an aggressive treatment. She made light conversation with the security guard who had wheeled her in. They chatted about flowers, warm air, the welcome sun. Part of her story is plain to see. Her tone of voice, her brightness keeps the rest hidden.

On two separate occasions recently I have seen women I know from a distance. Too far to greet them, but close enough to see that they, too, have shorn heads. Both beautiful; both stylish; both could easily carry the look. Hopeful, I asked a friend if the woman we saw at the same moment had shaved her head by choice. If anyone has the guts to do it, I thought, she does. “No,” said my friend. “It was not a choice.”

March wasn’t always a complicated month. I mostly considered it forgettable—one of those parts of the year that seem to slip by almost without notice. No real holidays, no big national events. Just a spell of time between the dark days of winter and the glory of the “real” spring months of warmth and life.

Then, years ago, a nephew was born. It became his birthday month. Eventually, after another stretch of years, my daughter was born. It was her month, too. Only two years passed before a family tragedy struck–sudden, inexplicable.

March became something different after that. A lopsided month that has a significance it doesn’t deserve; this previously nothing month. The joy of the two birthdays is now always weighed down by poignancy, even though we work hard to lighten the load.

Today, a long-awaited breakfast with friends I don’t see often enough. We greeted one another with laughter and hugs. And then we somberly recounted our connections among the newly dead, the recently hurt and ill. We live in a large city, but two of us know the family of the skier who died. One of us knows a man who lost three family members in the mudslide. Another knows relatives of the man seriously injured when the helicopter fell. All of us know one of the two women with shorn hair.

We stayed there a while, in the place where collective sadness helps rather than hurts, but then we started in on our brimming plates of warm food. We shifted the weight of our hearts and our conversation so we could talk of kids and school; of spring, blooms, and sunlight; of life eventually coming back and drying out the saturated earth. Because that’s what it does. Regardless of circumstances, regardless of the times it weighs us down, life just keeps on coming back.

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4 Comments

Filed under Root and Branch, Uncategorized

4 responses to “The Lamb

  1. How beautiful and clear a piece of writing this is. That last paragraph especially so, where the words cut that little bit deeper and burn that little bit more brightly. Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Magnolia’ came to mind immediately after finishing this – arguably my favourite film – and this is right up there with some of the best of the writing of yours I’ve read.

  2. I haven’t seen “Magnolia”, Matt, but I’ll give it a try now–despite the Tom Cruise element! But there’s your recommendation and Philip Seymour Hoffman, so….

    Thank you for your kind words. I’m glad the different elements came together for you. I hoped they would, but from this side of things it isn’t always easy to see if it will come through from the reader’s perspective.

    • Despite Cruise (and indeed because of him), it’s brilliant. Pace and tension and stories unfolding and intertwining. And beautiful details. Sadness and tragedy and a sense of not being able to cope, but life, as you say, having to go on. Well worth watching.

      • I’ll let you know when I’ve seen it, Matt. Sounds like the type of film I often gravitate towards. (I’ll like it better than “Beasts of the Southern Wild”–right?)

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